thefemaletyrant:

dynamicafrica:

Six Totally Unique Places to Visit in Africa:

The Big Pineapple
Bathurst, Eastern Cape, South Africa

If you’ve ever wondered where you can find the world’s largest artificial pineapple, your curious mind needn’t ponder anymore. Located about 55km from Grahamstown, the 16,7m-high attraction was created by members of the local agriculture community in Bathurst as a way of displaying their love for this tasty fruit as it grows in high abundance in the area.

Constructed and erected between 1990 and 1992, the Big Pineapple came into fruition on Summerhill Estate after a few of the local farmers went to the Sunshine Coast of Australia, saw their Big Pineapple, copied the idea and made an even bigger and better version.

Lake Reba/Lac Rose
Cap Vert Peninsula, Senegal

There aren’t many places in the world where you can see a pink lake. In fact, there are only two countries that host these incredible cotton candy-tinted waters. Aside from Australia’s Lake Hillier, Senegal’s Lac Rose is the only other of its kind in the world.

Less than an hour away from the capital city of Dakar, Lake Retba is separated only by some narrow dunes from the Atlantic Ocean. It gets its colour from Dunaliella salina, a type of algae that is attracted by the lake’s high salt content reaching as high as 40% in some areas. The bacteria produces a red pigment in order to absorb the sunlight which gives the lake its unique pink hue. Its saline content is comparable to that of the Dead Sea’s and exceeds it during the dry season (November to June). And yes, that means exactly what you think it does - you can float easy if you enter the lake.

Thanks to its high salt content, not many organisms can survive in the lake, which makes it useful for salt production. So if you visit the lake, you’ll also happen upon salt collectors in the area extracting this precious condiment from the bottom of the lake by hand. 

Chefchaouen
Chefchaouen, Morocco.

Rinsed in various hues of stand-out blues, this northwestern Moroccan city of ‘Chaouen’ (as it is often called by Moroccans) has become one of the most instantly recognized cities in the world, as well as a popular tourist destination. Yet, there is a rich history to the place that isn’t always as well known.

Situated in the Rif Mountains was originally founded in 1471, as a small fortress, by Moorish exiles from Spain, led by Moulay Ali Ben Moussa Ben Rached El Alami, to fight the Portuguese invasions of northern Morocco. It also became one of the few areas where Moriscos and Jews sought refuge in this mountainous city after the Spanish Reconquista in medieval times. In 1920, the Spanish seized Chefchaouen to form part of Spanish Morocco. With Morocco’s independence in 1956, the city was ‘returned’ and is known a part of modern-day Morocco.

The name of the area refers to the shape of the mountain tops above the town, that look like the two horns (chaoua) of a goat. “Chef Chaouen" derives from the Berber word for horns, Ichawen. The countryside around it has a reputation for being a prolific source of kief. The Chefchaouen region is one of the main producers of cannabis in Morocco. Hashish is subsequently sold all over town, but is mostly the domain of native Chaouenis.

Apparently, the town is painted blue to ward off mosquitoes.

The Rock Restaurant
Michanwi Pingwe beach, Zanzibar

It really isn’t hard to sell a place like this. What’s fancier than eating at a seafood restaurant atop a rock? I mean, you even have to take your shoes off before entering it. Whether you go for the food, location or both, it’s bound to be a memorable experience.

Avenue of the Baobabs
Menabe. Madagascar

One can only imagine that this place is as incredible as it looks. This dirt road between Morondava and Belon’i Tsiribihina in western Madagascar is lined and surrounded by majestic fort-like Baobab trees that are up to 800 years old and around 30 meters high. What’s more is that this particular species of baobab tree, of which there are nine in total, is endemic to Madagascar making the place all the more unique.

Meroë Pyramids
Shendi, Sudan

As much recognition, and deservedly so, that the pyramids of Giza, Egypt, receive, Sudan’s Nubian pyramids are a site to behold themselves. These architectural and archaeological feats are a testament to the greatness of the once formidable city of Meroë, the capital city of the now ancient Kingdom of Kush. From around
800 B.C. to 280 A.D., the Kingdom of Kush flourished and, influenced by Ancient Egypt, erected these pyramids as a way of burying their elite.

Although in various states of ruin, there are over 200 pyramids that are a combination of royal and non-royal tombs. It is a wonderfully complex site situated in North-East Sudan along the banks of the Nile River.

I was really excited to visit Lac Rose when I was in Senegal after seeing pictures such as the one above. Upon reaching Lac Rose I discovered that the lake is no longer pink! The guide explained that nature had taken it’s toll (the lake had been diluted with rainwater or something iirc), parts of the lack were pink but the vast majority was like any other body of water.

Maybe there are two Lac Roses in Senegal, sha the one I visited does not have pink waters.

gendertreason:

Saying “I support a sex industry - but only when the women are safe, healthy, and treated with dignity” is like saying “I support imperialism - but only when it works out well for the colonized people.” If the only version of a thing you support is a hypothetical version that has never actually existed in the history of that thing, you don’t actually support it.

blackourstory:

the-real-goddamazon:

mortalstardust:

freezepeachinspector:

laborreguitina:

pissnerd:

badbilliejean:

blackourstory:

Happy Black History YEAR!

Greatness.

loving how my old history teacher talked about them like a terrorist group

boost me up

Wow okay so for those skimming, there’s a memo up there from THE DIRECTOR OF THE FBI that sets a mission to LIE about the good things the Black Panthers were doing, spread rumors of them being terrorists, and terrorize the communities supporting them.

If you think the Black Panthers were terrorists and you’ve never heard of the community-building, it’s because there was a literal government conspiracy to make you and people 45 years ago think that way.

i’m reblogging again (bolding mine), because people need to fucking know this. especially white americans. 

This is true.

And we in the military are told the Black Panther Party is on the same level as the KKK and we’re not allowed to join it or go to any rallies or events hosted by the BPP.

I almost laughed when I saw it. I’m sure a few of the old-head Black chiefs laughed too.

This is the legacy of colonialism and white supremacy at work.

FOR THE LAST TWO WEEKS THIS POST HAS AT REMAINED AT “24,396” NOTES, DESPITE HAVING BEEN REBLOGGED HUNDREDS OF TIMES SINCE. WHY IS THAT TUMBLR??? ~ The OP
lilbijou:

dirtybrian:

thewitchylibrarian:

dirtybrian:

mattachinereview:


biyuti:


girljanitor:


dumbthingswhitepplsay:


popca:


dolgematki:


nativevoice:


“Stop sending expired food”….”fried chicken 64.99” 
IQALUIT, Nunavut — A head of cabbage for $20. Fifteen bucks for a small bag of apples.
A case of ginger ale: $82.
Fed up and frustrated by sky-high food prices and concerned over widespread hunger in their communities, thousands of Inuit have spent weeks posting pictures and price tags from their local grocery stores to a Facebook site called Feed My Family.
Read more: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20120608/inuit-food-prices-protest-120608/#ixzz1xKWAJkGe


Holy hell.


WHAT IN THE FUCK? This shit is not okay.


ughhslfkajsdlf gross gross gross
64.99?????


These people are starving for a reason.
Conservationists
have been starving
these people
to death for years.


Reblogging for the extra articles. 
Also… I might show up to this protest and support them. 


Pay attention to this stuff, please, followers who haven’t heard about this!  This kind of thing is completely erased in news media.


This is really fucking important.
This is why I don’t respect anyone who blindly supports the anti-sealing protestors. Because for a lot of people, it’s the only affordable option.
It’s not just Iqaluit. In Nain, Labrador this problem has been going on for ages and nobody does anything about it. $47 for a ham and $17 for a block of cheese. In Rigolet, Labrador, a loaf of bread costs $7. Here’s another picture of an Iqaluit food price changing before your very eyes.
The NNCP is starving people, reducing their food choices, and keeping people on EI poor. This is so, so wrong.

How can we help? I joined the group and checked out the website, but I didn’t see anything that can be actively done (other than raising awareness, which, of course, is great).

Excellent question! If you read through the group (which is here, for anyone who missed it), there are people talking about some ways to help.
Look at the latest news on the Feeding My Family website to see what the priorities are and how you might be able to help.
If you’re Canadian, call your local MP and ask to discuss this issue and express your concern.
Look up ways to support putting pressure onto airlines to charge fair rates (a $1000 plane ticket should be from one coast to the other, not a few hundred miles).
Research and learn what you can about food sustainability. For a start, how about learning square foot/metre (French intensive) gardening or container gardening and starting to practice it yourself? Share these techniques with friends and family. Get good at it so you can teach them to others who have poor food security in your own area.
For the love of God, stop signing “anti-sealing”/”anti-hunting” petitions and supporting Greenpeace’s actions without understanding the complicated, nuanced situation in the North.
Watch the FB group, because people there mention direct donations and ways to help the organizations actually on the ground there.
For example, one person is starting up a donation project/fundraiser.
Look at what organizations like FoodShare are doing and support them.
There is so much to be done. Sharing news articles and stories, lists of resources, donation and fundraising pages, and knowledge about food security is critical, but there’s a lot more work of all sorts.

My cousin is in Nunavut currently and pays $11 for a “share” size of skittles and $27 for a 32oz cranberry juice
it’s fucking wild

lilbijou:

dirtybrian:

thewitchylibrarian:

dirtybrian:

mattachinereview:

biyuti:

girljanitor:

dumbthingswhitepplsay:

popca:

dolgematki:

nativevoice:

“Stop sending expired food”….”fried chicken 64.99” 

IQALUIT, Nunavut — A head of cabbage for $20. Fifteen bucks for a small bag of apples.

A case of ginger ale: $82.

Fed up and frustrated by sky-high food prices and concerned over widespread hunger in their communities, thousands of Inuit have spent weeks posting pictures and price tags from their local grocery stores to a Facebook site called Feed My Family.

Holy hell.

WHAT IN THE FUCK? This shit is not okay.

ughhslfkajsdlf gross gross gross

64.99?????


These people are starving for a reason.

Conservationists

have been starving

these people

to death for years.

Reblogging for the extra articles. 

Also… I might show up to this protest and support them. 

Pay attention to this stuff, please, followers who haven’t heard about this!  This kind of thing is completely erased in news media.

This is really fucking important.

This is why I don’t respect anyone who blindly supports the anti-sealing protestors. Because for a lot of people, it’s the only affordable option.

It’s not just Iqaluit. In Nain, Labrador this problem has been going on for ages and nobody does anything about it. $47 for a ham and $17 for a block of cheese. In Rigolet, Labrador, a loaf of bread costs $7. Here’s another picture of an Iqaluit food price changing before your very eyes.

The NNCP is starving people, reducing their food choices, and keeping people on EI poor. This is so, so wrong.

How can we help? I joined the group and checked out the website, but I didn’t see anything that can be actively done (other than raising awareness, which, of course, is great).

Excellent question! If you read through the group (which is here, for anyone who missed it), there are people talking about some ways to help.

  • Look at the latest news on the Feeding My Family website to see what the priorities are and how you might be able to help.
  • If you’re Canadian, call your local MP and ask to discuss this issue and express your concern.
  • Look up ways to support putting pressure onto airlines to charge fair rates (a $1000 plane ticket should be from one coast to the other, not a few hundred miles).
  • Research and learn what you can about food sustainability. For a start, how about learning square foot/metre (French intensive) gardening or container gardening and starting to practice it yourself? Share these techniques with friends and family. Get good at it so you can teach them to others who have poor food security in your own area.
  • For the love of God, stop signing “anti-sealing”/”anti-hunting” petitions and supporting Greenpeace’s actions without understanding the complicated, nuanced situation in the North.
  • Watch the FB group, because people there mention direct donations and ways to help the organizations actually on the ground there.
  • For example, one person is starting up a donation project/fundraiser.
  • Look at what organizations like FoodShare are doing and support them.

There is so much to be done. Sharing news articles and stories, lists of resources, donation and fundraising pages, and knowledge about food security is critical, but there’s a lot more work of all sorts.

My cousin is in Nunavut currently and pays $11 for a “share” size of skittles and $27 for a 32oz cranberry juice

it’s fucking wild

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